Balancing Agility with Governance

Balancing Agility with GovernanceIt’s not often that I get the opportunity to help facilitate at an agile conference, but yesterday I did just that. I had the pleasure of helping Ian Spence deliver his session at RallyON 2013 in London. The theme of the session was about balancing the goals of agility with the need for governance, compliance and standards.

Most of us by now are familiar with the agile manifesto, and how it states “while we value the things on the right, we value the things on the left more” i.e. individuals and interactions are more valuable than processes and tools, but there is still some value in the latter. The point of the session was that we need to achieve a balance between agility and other things like governance, compliance and standards – things which are very often thought of as conflicting with agile and therefore “the enemy”! This is especially true in large organisations. But people whose job is to implement governance regimes, ensure compliance, and that standards are followed, are also people – people that agile development teams need to interact with.

Anyway, theory over, it was time to play some games – card games to be precise. Ian introduced Alpha State Cards, a simple tool for understanding project health and progress, by focusing on underlying performance indicators – indicators that are essential to all software endeavors regardless of method, process, life-cycle or practices being followed.

We only played a couple of these games: the first was using the cards to understand the state of an example project, the second to determine the required state of key project indicators before a team would be ready to start sprinting. But it was enough to see that a simple lightweight card-based approach could be a useful addition to one's agile toolkit, and help facilitate conversations between different stakeholders in an entirely method-neutral manner.

Ian then showed us how, using the cards to create checkpoints, a lean and lightweight governance model can be quickly constructed: one that is based on objective outcomes, rather than documentation.

The games, and the cards, are both available here if you want to try them out.