"Earning" earned value by Ivar Jacobson

Traditional project management approaches focus on planning in detail, assigning the resulting tasks to people and then tracking "progress" as measured by completed tasks. The problem with measuring progress this way is that completing a task, while important, is hard to correlate with progress against the overall goal - just because you've completed 20% of the tasks does not mean that you're 20% done - and for tasks that take a long time to complete the self-reported estimates of "percent complete" is often merely "wishful thinking".

My preference is to measure progress in a concrete and measurable way - in the form of tested scenarios, following an iterative project management approach.  In other words, planning works iteration by iteration, with each iteration developing and testing one or more scenarios.  At the end of each iteration, you have a set of developed and tested scenarios, making progress easier to measure: knowing that you've developed and tested 20 out of 100 scenarios is a lot more meaningful than knowing that you've completed 20% of the tasks - especially if those tasks are focused on creating documentation rather than running and tested code.  Scenarios correlate nicely with business value - each scenario should be useful to at least some subset of the stakeholders.  In my view, only when you've successfully tested a scenario can you claim to have "earned value".

1 Comment
  1. PM Hut | May 15, 2008 at 7:42 pm Reply

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    Hi Ivar,

    How do you create a test scenario (on which basis), and what is usually the length of a test scenario?