EssUP Launches by Ivar Jacobson

Yesterday we launched Essential Unified Process in the UK. We had around 180 attendants and these were all invited by us. We wanted participants that could help us understand if we are on the right path.

I think we can count this event as very successful. We all felt very upbeat afterwards when we met at a pub.

In the picture above I am the guy who gesticulates. The others are from left to right: Agneta Jacobson (CEO of Jaczone), Pan Wei Ng and Ian Spence (both Chief Scientists of Ivar Jacobson Consulting) and Chris Littlejohns (managing director of Ivar Jacobson Consulting UK).

The most central idea behind the Next Generation Process (NGP) is that Practices are First Class Citizens and Process is just a composition of Practices. This is then followed up by three innovations (in no particular order):

  • Practice Separation and Composition. This is an idea I first presented at the Agile Conference in New Orleans in August 2003.
  • Practice User Experience using the card metaphor to move the focus to the developers away from the process engineers. This idea originates from Brian Kerr at Ivar Jacobson Consulting in the UK.
  • Practice Smartness using intelligent agents to make process active. This comes from Jaczone’s WayPointer.

Essential Unified Process is a first incarnation of the NGP. It is a package of practices…8 to be exact. It could equally well have been 5 or 10, the most important things are the practices and not the package. Apart from the three major innovations mentioned earlier, there are many other ideas in what we mean with NGP. We have alphas and betas, competencies instead of roles, aspect-oriented thinking, how we make EssUP agile with social engineering practices, etc. Ian Spence showed how we have created three games to play the cards. There is a process assembly game, a process planning game and a project game in which the team actually develops software. (We have a paper to be published in August in Dr Dobb’s Journal). Today, on the surface RUP is hardly recognizable in EssUP (but of course EssUP is a great way to move to RUP; it is also very easy to move a RUP customer over to EssUP).

NGP Infrastructure has been developed to prototype status. Pan Wei Ng demonstrated navigation through practices, authoring of practices and cards, composition of practices. I think it is fair to say that the audience was very impressed getting a glimpse of NGPI. Many people came up to me afterwards and said that our work on NGPI really gives us credibility. EssUP with physical cards is a good start. With an electronic version of the cards we give the card metaphor a face in the tool world. I believe that NGPI helps us to move people from being excited about EssUP to wanting to plan their first EssUP project, something our launch proved.

WayPointer is now a mature and proven product. Several persons came up to me and said that the latest version is a big step forward. WayPointer is already very effective when it comes to to the complete adoption of software development best practices by a team. With our practice-centric approach another role of WayPointer becomes evident. For each practice we can now offer cards and guidelines with the most essential knowledge and as additional leverage provide support from intelligent agents to help people both with the cards/guidelines but also with all the other more specific and context sensitive advices that are made explicit in books or elsewhere. WayPointer will of course also provide automation and real-time quality checks for the practices. Together these components provide an unprecedented framework for process dissemination. The story starts to get together in a wonderful way.

We have a fantastic story. People definitely see us as The Thought Leaders on Process. However, this is not enough for us. We don’t just want them to see us as thought leaders. We want them to come to us and ask for services and products. Thanks to our very strong team we can deliver that.