EssWork

De wereld van Practices – Wat is een Practice?

De wereld van Practices   Wat is een Practice?Bij IJI staan we een practice-gedreven aanpak voor. Zoals met veel concepten en principes geldt ook hier dat een goed begrip van wat ermee wordt bedoeld essentieel is om er echt de vruchten van te plukken. Een manier om daar invulling aan te geven is om te kijken naar criteria waaraan je een goede practice kunt herkennen. Maar voor we dat doen, is het goed om eerst te kijken naar de definitie en kenmerken van een practice en een practice-gedreven aanpak.

Onder een practice-gedreven aanpak verstaan we onder meer “het samenstellen van een effectieve manier van werken op basis van relevante procescomponenten”. In plaats van moeizaam te proberen een procesraamwerk toe te snijden op een specifiek project draaien we het om; we selecteren alleen relevante procescomponenten en assembleren die tot een consistent proces. En zo’n procescomponent noemen we dan een practice. Use Cases, User Stories en Iteratief ontwikkelen zijn enkele voorbeelden van practices. Andere voorbeelden zijn Operationaliseren Systeem en Datamigratie. In deze context is het ultieme doel van een practice-gedreven aanpak “betere resultaten boeken met softwareontwikkeling”. Hierbij kun je dan denken aan betere software, goedkoper, sneller en een prettigere manier van werken. Read More

TechED by Ivar Jacobson

Barcelona is my last stop on an around the world trip that started Oct 17 from Stockholm. That morning I gave a talk to key developers at a key Swedish company developing key telecom products :). After my talk I rushed to the airport and flew to Tokyo to meet some key people from large software companies. After Tokyo I went to Taipei, followed by San Francisco and now Barcelona. This is my 6th around the world trip this year with one more to go before the end of year – three less than last year. As you can see I am slowing down.

Barcelona hosted one of the largest software conferences this year, the Microsoft Tech•Ed – Developer conference and yesterday I gave, together with my colleague Pan-Wei Ng, a talk on Next Generation Process (NGP). Here is the core idea of the talk:

The world of software development is constantly changing and evolving. New ideas arise all the time and existing ideas go in and out of fashion. Software development processes find it very hard to keep up with this rapid rate of change, especially as they find themselves quickly going out of fashion or becoming bloated as they bolt on more and more information. Teams find themselves struggling as they try to mix-and-match practices from various sources into a coherent way-of-working.

A new approach to capturing and sharing experience is required. In my company, Ivar Jacobson International, we have developed a fundamentally new way of managing software development that downplays the importance of process – in particular big process. Instead practices become important. A practice is a way of working with a clear beginning and a clear end. Following a practice should give a clear result of value. Instead of trying to give an academic definition, let me give some examples: Iterative development is a practice that you can imagine to use separately to how you specify requirement or define your architecture.

  1. Practices are First Class Citizens
  2. Practices can be made smart to truly help the developers in their work, this is achieved with WayPointer
  3. Practices can be used individually or in a multitude of combinations
  4. Process is just a composition of Practices, and
  5. Teams compose the process they need by selecting just the practices that they want to use

As you can see this is a paradigm shift. We move away from working with a big monolithic process (like RUP) to working with practices. Process is downplayed to just become a composition of practices.

To enable this, a number of innovations are required: innovations related to the way that practices are collected, presented and applied. We have developed two components to realize these innovations:

EssWork is a new set of tools for deploying practices in an organization. These tools allow you to author practices separately and to compose them to a process. They allow you to use a completely new way of learning, adopting, scaling up, and changing your selected practices. You use cards to describe your practices, to plan your project and to guide you in developing software. Cards are good because they force us to be very brief in describing process elements. You focus on the essentials, which makes practices very lightweight.

EssWork is available on top of several platforms: Eclipse, EPF, VSTS so you can have the same process independently from which vendor tools you use. On top of EssWork we have built a first set of eight practices called EssUP (Essential Unified Process).

EssUP is just a subset of all the practices we eventually will see on EssWork. Five of these practices are traditional Unified Process practices: use cases, architecture, iterations, components and products. Moreover, there is one practice which supports social engineering practices unique for agile methods, and one practice for process improvement derived from the process improvement camp such as CMMI.

However, we are not dogmatic about which practices you should use. You can replace any practice that we offer with a competing practice from your favourite methodology. You can also add practices that you have discovered yourself. Mix and match is our recipe.

Best of all: EssWork and EssUP are going to be Open Source! I can’t give a date, but it will happen as soon as possible.

The presentation was completely full (around 500 people) which was a fantastic result – there were people standing in the auditorium and watching on the remote screen outside So there is much to do going forward.

Various Podcasts were arranged. This is one:
http://www.mseventseurope.com/TechEd/06/Pre/Live/VideoDev9.aspx?id=3#an3