lifecycle

The Power of Checklists

The Power of ChecklistsSurgeons, astronauts, airline pilots and software professionals. What do all these people have in common? Well, for one, all of these professionals are very highly trained – in most cases in takes many years to reach a point where you can practice without supervision.

But even highly trained, experienced professionals can have a bad day, and make the occasional mistake. The problem is, if you’re an astronaut, airline pilot, or surgeon, and you make a mistake, lives can be lost. Software development, perhaps, is somewhat less life-critical, most of the time.

Simple checklists can help reduce human error dramatically. Some reports suggest that surgical checklists introduced by the World Health Organization have helped reduce mortality rates in major surgery by as much as 47%. Neil Armstrong had a checklist printed on the back of his glove (pictured), to ensure he remembered the important things as he made history as the first person to walk on the moon.

So if checklists can save lives, keep aircraft in the air, and help take people to the moon and back, why not utilize them to keep software projects on track, and help maximize the delivery of value, and minimize the risk of project failure?

Checklists help highly trained professionals focus on, and remember, the stuff that is important, and critical to the success of the endeavor they are working on. Unlike traditional process documentation, checklists are, by definition, lean, light and concise, so work well with agile development. The point is that they don’t burden a professional with lots of extra things to remember, or try to be prescriptive about how things are done – experienced professionals can generally be trusted to do the job properly, and make the right decisions when circumstances demand it – a checklist simply acts as an “aide-memoir” so nothing vital is forgotten.

So what does a software project checklist look like? Fortunately, some smart people have already done some work in this area, identifying a core set of checklists that can be applied to any software project, regardless of practices being applied, life-cycle being followed, or the technology or languages being used. They have been particularly effective when used in conjunction with agile approaches such as Scrum. These checklists are available in card form as Alpha State Cards, or as an iOS app.

You can learn more about the checklists by attending this free webinar.

Your feedback is welcomed!

Balancing Agility with Governance

Balancing Agility with GovernanceIt’s not often that I get the opportunity to help facilitate at an agile conference, but yesterday I did just that. I had the pleasure of helping Ian Spence deliver his session at RallyON 2013 in London. The theme of the session was about balancing the goals of agility with the need for governance, compliance and standards.

Most of us by now are familiar with the agile manifesto, and how it states “while we value the things on the right, we value the things on the left more” i.e. individuals and interactions are more valuable than processes and tools, but there is still some value in the latter. The point of the session was that we need to achieve a balance between agility and other things like governance, compliance and standards – things which are very often thought of as conflicting with agile and therefore “the enemy”! This is especially true in large organisations. But people whose job is to implement governance regimes, ensure compliance, and that standards are followed, are also people – people that agile development teams need to interact with.

Anyway, theory over, it was time to play some games – card games to be precise. Ian introduced Alpha State Cards, a simple tool for understanding project health and progress, by focusing on underlying performance indicators – indicators that are essential to all software endeavors regardless of method, process, life-cycle or practices being followed.

We only played a couple of these games: the first was using the cards to understand the state of an example project, the second to determine the required state of key project indicators before a team would be ready to start sprinting. But it was enough to see that a simple lightweight card-based approach could be a useful addition to one's agile toolkit, and help facilitate conversations between different stakeholders in an entirely method-neutral manner.

Ian then showed us how, using the cards to create checkpoints, a lean and lightweight governance model can be quickly constructed: one that is based on objective outcomes, rather than documentation.

The games, and the cards, are both available here if you want to try them out.

Light Weight Software Development Process using State Cards

Light Weight Software Development Process using State CardsIt is a well known fact that all software is different; all software development teams are also different. So, why should we expect software development processes be fixed? There is no such thing as “one size fits all.” Yet, it is also common sense that there must be something in common, as otherwise there is absolutely no way to learn from experience and mistakes. The challenge is then, to find a middle ground that is easy to communicate to the development team and stakeholders. In the next few blog postings, I will present a pragmatic approach using a deck of A8 (5 1/4" x 7 7/8") sized state-cards that is small enough to fit into your pocket. I will demonstrate how you can use the state-cards to understand the state of software development, how to define your lifecycle model and how you can use it to define your value streams. It is important to get your team to define and own their software development process and state-cards provides the building blocks to do this.

The posts to follow on this topic include:

1.       The Software Development Process Challenge

2.       A Solution through a Deck of Cards

3.       Dynamic Software Development Lifecycle with State-Cards

4.       Lean Iterative Management with State-Cards

5.       Organizing Design of Lean and Agile Teams

6.       Effective Work Assignment Using State Cards

7.       Applying State-cards to Manage Software Development

The Kernel Journals 6: Where to (first/next)?

The Kernel Journals 6: Where to (first/next)?We all know that we want to “cut to the chase” as soon as we can and start incrementally developing the software product through which we deliver value back to the business. But we also know that there are certain essential pre-requisites to “sprinting”, such as some kind of vision of where we are supposed to be going and the right team and tools to get us there. If we start motoring before we are ready we may head off in the wrong direction or we may find that the wheels come off as we accelerate through the gears. Read More