project milestones

The Power of Checklists

The Power of ChecklistsSurgeons, astronauts, airline pilots and software professionals. What do all these people have in common? Well, for one, all of these professionals are very highly trained – in most cases in takes many years to reach a point where you can practice without supervision.

But even highly trained, experienced professionals can have a bad day, and make the occasional mistake. The problem is, if you’re an astronaut, airline pilot, or surgeon, and you make a mistake, lives can be lost. Software development, perhaps, is somewhat less life-critical, most of the time.

Simple checklists can help reduce human error dramatically. Some reports suggest that surgical checklists introduced by the World Health Organization have helped reduce mortality rates in major surgery by as much as 47%. Neil Armstrong had a checklist printed on the back of his glove (pictured), to ensure he remembered the important things as he made history as the first person to walk on the moon.

So if checklists can save lives, keep aircraft in the air, and help take people to the moon and back, why not utilize them to keep software projects on track, and help maximize the delivery of value, and minimize the risk of project failure?

Checklists help highly trained professionals focus on, and remember, the stuff that is important, and critical to the success of the endeavor they are working on. Unlike traditional process documentation, checklists are, by definition, lean, light and concise, so work well with agile development. The point is that they don’t burden a professional with lots of extra things to remember, or try to be prescriptive about how things are done – experienced professionals can generally be trusted to do the job properly, and make the right decisions when circumstances demand it – a checklist simply acts as an “aide-memoir” so nothing vital is forgotten.

So what does a software project checklist look like? Fortunately, some smart people have already done some work in this area, identifying a core set of checklists that can be applied to any software project, regardless of practices being applied, life-cycle being followed, or the technology or languages being used. They have been particularly effective when used in conjunction with agile approaches such as Scrum. These checklists are available in card form as Alpha State Cards, or as an iOS app.

You can learn more about the checklists by attending this free webinar.

Your feedback is welcomed!

A Hammerhead Shark versus James Bond in Speedos

A  Hammerhead Shark versus James Bond in SpeedosI’ve often found that most of the questioning about the worth of agile tends to come from the Project Management community. That’s not a criticism on PM’s but an acknowledgement that for them it’s probably more difficult to see how this agile concept can work.

Traditionally PM’s have tended to need their eyes pointing in different directions – one on the day to day development activities of the team, the detailed planning and daily progress, and one on the bigger picture, the long term roadmap and strategic planning side of a project. And, unless you’re a Hammerhead Shark – this is always going to be a tricky feat.

The trouble with agile, or more accurately, the trouble with some people’s interpretation of agile, is that it can be seen as an excuse to just focus on the tactical side of planning which leaves PM’s wondering what happens to all the stuff their other eye is usually pointing at.

So does being agile really mean ignoring the high level strategic side of managing and planning a project? Will the scent of burning Prince2 manuals soon pervade?

Fortunately this is not what agile means at all – in fact Scrum, which we all know and love, is pretty keen to remind us that we should still do release planning, risk management, and all those important things, it just doesn’t presume to tell us how to do them (in much the same way as it doesn’t tell us how to breathe, eat, sleep or do any other number of bodily functions we should still be doing whilst we’re Scrumming). What we are left to figure out for ourselves, as fully capable agile dudes, is how to ensure that we can stay agile for the long haul, which means having a sustainable and scalable approach to agility.

So how does that work? Is it really possible to add the governance, compliance, risk management and high level planning elements of managing a project to an agile approach without losing the agility? (Let’s hope so, for agile’s sake, because it is clearly and undeniably necessary).

Well, yes, of course, it is possible – otherwise agile just wouldn’t work. But it has to be done in a certain way. Let’s face it – you wouldn’t send James Bond out in full suit of armour, a wetsuit, padded ski suit and a parachute every time he went on a mission. Not only would it be a tad cumbersome, it would also be unnecessary (given that sometimes he gets away with just a small pair of Speedos). What you would do is give him exactly the right amount of kit required for a given situation. The same applies to agile. What’s needed is exactly the right amount of governance, planning and compliance for a given project – no more, no less.

So hang on – what have we got so far? James Bond in Speedos and a hammerhead shark. Which one is the PM? Well in a way it’s both, and neither. Confused? Good. Me too.

And I guess that is the point. A PM’s job is not easy and while they would love to be 007 in speedos (figuratively) – agile, unencumbered, able to work quickly and focus on getting the job done, they still need that hammerhead with one eye on all the ‘other stuff’.

I don’t think we can ever get rid of all that ‘other stuff’. It’s necessary and important. But we can minimise it so that only the right amount of ‘other stuff’ is put in place and we do what NEEDS TO BE DONE, building up from a minimal set (should I mention speedos again?) rather than starting out with everything, including the wetsuit and the parachute. This then, in essence, is the key to disciplined agile.

The PM still needs and will always need to be able to look at both the strategic and tactical side of a project, but with this approach maybe they need be less of a hammerhead. With agile self-organising teams the tactical planning side of a project is very much a team effort and, along with release and sprint burn-downs, daily stand-ups and sprint retrospectives, the tactical management is much less of an overhead.

So maybe, now, a normal shaped head will do, with just two eyes and some kind of innovative mechanism that will turn that head, allowing the PM to focus on the strategic but throw a glance towards the tactical when necessary.

Or maybe I’m just sticking my neck out.

Learn more about lightweight essential governance for agile projects.

Read the article: Agile and SEMAT - Perfect Partners.

Balancing Agility with Governance

Balancing Agility with GovernanceIt’s not often that I get the opportunity to help facilitate at an agile conference, but yesterday I did just that. I had the pleasure of helping Ian Spence deliver his session at RallyON 2013 in London. The theme of the session was about balancing the goals of agility with the need for governance, compliance and standards.

Most of us by now are familiar with the agile manifesto, and how it states “while we value the things on the right, we value the things on the left more” i.e. individuals and interactions are more valuable than processes and tools, but there is still some value in the latter. The point of the session was that we need to achieve a balance between agility and other things like governance, compliance and standards – things which are very often thought of as conflicting with agile and therefore “the enemy”! This is especially true in large organisations. But people whose job is to implement governance regimes, ensure compliance, and that standards are followed, are also people – people that agile development teams need to interact with.

Anyway, theory over, it was time to play some games – card games to be precise. Ian introduced Alpha State Cards, a simple tool for understanding project health and progress, by focusing on underlying performance indicators – indicators that are essential to all software endeavors regardless of method, process, life-cycle or practices being followed.

We only played a couple of these games: the first was using the cards to understand the state of an example project, the second to determine the required state of key project indicators before a team would be ready to start sprinting. But it was enough to see that a simple lightweight card-based approach could be a useful addition to one's agile toolkit, and help facilitate conversations between different stakeholders in an entirely method-neutral manner.

Ian then showed us how, using the cards to create checkpoints, a lean and lightweight governance model can be quickly constructed: one that is based on objective outcomes, rather than documentation.

The games, and the cards, are both available here if you want to try them out.

The Kernel Journals 7: SatNav for Software Development Projects

In the last Kernel Journal we looked at the problem that Barry Boehm was aiming to solve back in 1995 when he first proposed his three standard process milestones (which later gained industry prominence as the milestones in the Unified Software Development Process and the Rational Unified Process), namely that “the proliferation of software process models provides flexibility”, but leaves us “with no common anchor points around which to plan and control.” [Barry Boehm, November 1995]. We looked at how a small set of domain entities with simple state progression models (which we call “Alphas”) can make these common anchor points much more practical and useful while ensuring that they remain process-neutral and do not become “document-driven”.

The alphas, when used with common milestones such as the Unified Process Milestones, can actually give us much more than this – they can provide a project status and health dashboard that can be used by the customer and supplier organizations to assess the current status and health of any / all projects, irrespective of which processes or practices they are following. The graphic below shows just such a dashboard, with a set of kernel alphas and a traffic-light status for each alpha, which is derived by comparing where the project is now (the state machine to the left of each traffic light) with where it needs to be to achieve the next project milestone (the state machine to the right of each traffic light).The Kernel Journals 7: SatNav for Software Development Projects

In Kernel Journal 5: “Making the Invisible Visible” I described how we can easily “skin” a process kernel, by providing a portal for projects to capture, share and agree the essential project information that is needed to achieve each state progression (for example, using a set of templated Wiki pages). Once we have done this, we can make the alpha dashboard much more useful to the project teams themselves, by flagging which sections of the project portal need to be updated and agreed to get the project to where it needs to go next.

This gives us the equivalent of a Satellite Navigation System for our software projects project that enables us to:

  • Set our journey destination and waypoints (milestones)
  • Track where we are now, compared to where we want to be
  • Get guidance on what to do next in order to progress towards our destination.


 

The Kernel Journals 6: Where to (first/next)?

The Kernel Journals 6: Where to (first/next)?We all know that we want to “cut to the chase” as soon as we can and start incrementally developing the software product through which we deliver value back to the business. But we also know that there are certain essential pre-requisites to “sprinting”, such as some kind of vision of where we are supposed to be going and the right team and tools to get us there. If we start motoring before we are ready we may head off in the wrong direction or we may find that the wheels come off as we accelerate through the gears. Read More